NASA Glenn Workers Receive Silver Snoopy Awards for Space Work

nasa-logoGlennSilverSnoopyGroupTwelve workforce members at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland were recognized with NASA’s prestigious Silver Snoopy award for outstanding performance and professional dedication to human flight safety or mission success.  Glenn’s Deputy Director Greg Robinson and Associate Director Janet Watkins joined astronaut Douglas H. Wheelock in presenting the awards during a ceremony at the center.

NASA’s Astronaut Office annually awards the Silver Snoopy pin to employees who have significantly contributed to the space agency’s goals for human exploration and development of space.  The award program started in 1968 after NASA approached Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz.  Schultz, a champion of NASA and the space program, agreed to personally create the design for the “Astronaut Snoopy” award pin in addition to the program’s promotional artwork.  The award is presented annually to no more than one percent of NASA’s eligible workforce members.

Glenn’s 2013 Silver Snoopy recipients:

Eric H. Baker, Mayfield Village, an employee of Connecticut Reserve Technologies, works in the Structures and Materials Division.  He was recognized for outstanding structural analysis and superior technical capability in developing critical technologies to ensure the safety and reliability of spaceflight hardware for future space transportation systems.

Robert Bruckner, Strongsville, works in the Structures and Materials Division.  He was recognized for identifying the root cause of the International Space Station’s thermal control pump failure during Expedition 25, which enabled specific operational modifications required to ensure future reliability, safety and performance of the critical space station thermal control systems.

Dale Dragony, Olmsted Township, works in the Mechanical and Fluids Systems Division.  He was recognized for outstanding technical support as principal designer for two key Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle engineering studies: use of the European Space Agency’s service module and the propulsion affordability study.

Timothy Dunlap, Strongsville, works in the Manufacturing Division.  He was recognized for developing a method to hermetically seal sample tubes, eliminating the possibility of compromised science due to diminished fluid levels, that substantially improved the quality, performance and reliability of the In SPACE-3 experiment program.

Alan Linne, North Royalton, works in the Chief Engineer’s Office.  He was recognized for leadership in developing and implementing the first integrated, multi-project Systems Engineering Management Plan, which has resulted in a more streamlined, effective process for meeting technical requirements for all International Space Station experiments and human research projects.

Richard Manco, Brunswick, an employee of Sierra Lobo Inc., works in the Testing Division.  He was recognized for significant contributions to ensure flight safety and mission success of the International Space Station through the design, build and operation of a flow visualization test rig that produced data critical to validating the root cause failure mechanism of the space station thermal control system pump during Expedition 25.

Alexandra Mills, North Ridgeville, an employee of SGT Inc., works in the International Space Station and Human Health Office.  She was recognized for dedication and hard work in establishing office level processes to streamline reporting critical information to management internal/external to the center, resulting in a more productive environment.

Xuan Nguyen, Strongsville, works in the International Space Station and Human Health Office.  She was recognized for providing mission planning, manifesting and integration activities for Glenn’s Physical Sciences Research Program investigations deployed to the space station over the past 12 years.

Ruth Scina, North Olmsted, an employee of DB Consulting Group Inc., works in the Space Operations Project Office.  She was recognized for sustained outstanding project management support to Glenn’s Space Communications Office projects and NASA’s Space Communications and Navigation program.

Thomas Shane Sowers, Medina, an employee of Vantage Partners, works in the Communications, Instrumentation and Controls Division.  He was recognized for developing critical liquid rocket-engine health-management technologies focused on improving the safety of future manned spacecraft, including the Systematic Sensor Selection Strategy (S4) to improve engine diagnostic capabilities and  post-flight maintenance, and complex Monte Carlo-based engine simulation tools to quantify the effectiveness of a failure detection system for the J–2X engine.

Mark Wernet, Broadview Heights, works in the Communications, Instrumentation and Controls Division.  He was recognized for his expertise in developing nonintrusive diagnostics for understanding the intricacies of complex fluid flows aiding the expansion of critical research payloads for the Human Spaceflight Program and successful utilization of the International Space Station.

Michael  Zernic, Highland Heights, works in the Space Operations Project Office.  He was recognized for sustained public service and project leadership contributing to the development of a number of areas critical to human space flight, including the International Space Station’s power system, communications technology and network services planning and operations.

To learn more about NASA Glenn, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/glenn

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